beholdmyrobes:

beholdmyrobes:

hello world i’m willingly awake before noon and trying to adjust to this strange new lifestyle

i just fucking poured orange juice into my coffee

We were grabbing a bite of lunch at a small cafe, in a mall, right across from a booth that sold jewelry and where ears could be pierced for a fee. A mother approaches with a little girl of six or seven years old. The little girl is clearly stating that she doesn’t want her ears pierced, that’s she’s afraid of how much it will hurt, that she doesn’t like earrings much in the first place. Her protests, her clear ‘no’ is simply not heard. The mother and two other women, who work the booth, begin chatting and trying to engage the little girl in picking out a pair of earrings. She has to wear a particular kind when the piercing is first done but she could pick out a fun pair for later.

"I don’t want my ears pierced."

"I don’t want any earrings."

The three adults glance at each other conspiratorially and now the pressure really begins. She will look so nice, all the other girls she knows wear earrings, the pain isn’t bad.

She, the child, sees what’s coming and starts crying. As the adults up the volume so does she, she’s crying and emitting a low wail at the same time. “I DON’T WANT MY EARS PIERCED.”

Her mother leans down and speaks to her, quietly but strongly, the only words we could hear were ‘… embarrassing me.’

We heard, then, two small screams, when the ears were pierced.

Little children learn early and often that ‘no doesn’t mean no.’

Little children learn early that no one will stand with them, even the two old men looking horrified at the events from the cafeteria.

Little girls learn early and often that their will is not their own.

No means no, yeah, right.

Most often, for kids and others without power, ”no means force.”

” —

from "No Means Force" at Dave Hingsburger’s blog.

This is important. It doesn’t just apply to little girls and other children, though it often begins there.

For the marginalized, our “no’s” are discounted as frivolous protests, rebelliousness, or anger issues, or we don’t know what we’re talking about, or we don’t understand what’s happening.

When “no means force” we become afraid to say no.

(via k-pagination)

katiegeewhiz:

I REALLY LOVE EVERYTHING ABOUT THIS

bahtmun:

Now, you should listen to this ‘cause this concerns you.

threelisabeth:

so sorry for my delayed response to this email, i have been very swamped being a confused and frightened idiot who can’t do basic life tasks like respond to her emails

poppyfieldmouse:

I’m dead, they’re such an adorable couple

“People said “You must be mad, or on drugs,” which I found a bit disappointing. What about imagination? It reflects our time that people sooner assume you’re on drugs or mad, rather than free.” — Noel Fielding for The Guardian (via sand-groper)

And the rest of us are not treated like human beings. Period.(x)

It’s very lonely on the road. It’s especially lonely for the girls. As Christine has said to me many times, ‘Stevie, this is your passion. It is not my passion.’

“Of course I’ll hurt you. Of course you’ll hurt me. Of course we will hurt each other. But this is the very condition of existence. To become spring, means accepting the risk of winter. To become presence, means accepting the risk of absence.” — The Little Prince

“But, Noel Fielding is a very fine performer. I think he’s one of the few performers who could probably take almost any substance and still perform to a very high standard. He’s very sharp and quick witted. I think you could probably put him in an oxygen tent with a burning tyre, leave him in it for about an hour, then kick him onto the stage at the Palladium and he’d do you a perfectly good hour. For all I know, that’s part of his preparation.” — Russell Brand  (via thecouchwitch)